Unaccompanied migrant children need our help

Tens of thousands of children fleeing desperate conditions have entered the United States asking for help. And many more are coming. What kind of welcome is being offered to them? The answer to that question is still largely undetermined.

Tens of thousands of children fleeing desperate conditions have entered the United States asking for help. And many more are coming. What kind of welcome is being offered to them? The answer to that question is still largely undetermined.

According to Human Rights Watch, the U.S. government predicts that 90,000 unaccompanied migrant children will cross the U.S.-Mexico border in fiscal year 2014, more than 10 times the number who crossed in 2011. And thousands of other children have crossed with a parent, also an increase from previous years.  

Reportedly, more than 90 percent of these children are from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, where pervasive drug/gang violence and poverty have made their lives dangerous and miserable.

It is said that drugs go north and guns and money go south. Therefore, it is essential in the U.S. that adequate treatment for addiction replace jail time for non-violent drug users, that all loopholes in gun export laws be closed, that serious gun-control laws — such as a total ban on all assault weapons — be passed, and that greatly increased U.S. aid to these Central American nations for schools, job creation through clean industry and agricultural development, infrastructure and fair trade practices become realities.

Injustices resulting from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) are contributing factors towards the flow of unaccompanied migrant children. 

According to Barbara Briggs, associate director of the Institute for Global Labor and Human Rights (www.globallabourrights.org), these “free trade” agreements in many cases greatly boost American corporate profits, while undercutting poor workers, domestic industries, and agriculture south of the U.S. border.

Under NAFTA and CAFTA U.S. companies are often building factories where they are permitted to pay the cheapest wages and lowest benefits to poor workers. These U.S. corporate injustices are in many cases contributing factors driving Latin Americans — adults and children — to seek fairer working and living conditions in the U.S., Briggs said.

The “Decent Working Conditions and Fair Competition Act” would greatly correct many American corporate injustices abroad. Please ask you congressional delegation to reintroduce this legislation.

While addressing the root-causes of unaccompanied migrant children is essential, we need to also kindly address the immediate needs of these young brothers and sisters.

Instead of viewing these children as criminals who are illegally entering the U.S., a totally humanitarian Christ-like response is needed.

A coalition of immigration and faith-based organizations — including the Catholic Legal Immigration Network and Catholic Charities — sponsored by Human Rights First recently sent President Barack Obama a letter opposing plans to expedite deportation of migrant children.

They wrote, “The administration’s recent statements have placed far greater emphasis on deterrence of migration than on the importance of protection of children seeking safety.”

Please urge President Obama and your congressional delegation to insure that these children get all the help they need. 

And sign up to receive legislative alerts from the bishops’ campaign for immigrants by going to www.justiceforimmigrants.org.  

Responding to unaccompanied migrant children seeking asylum in the U.S. Pope Francis recently wrote, “This humanitarian emergency requires … these children be welcomed and protected,” and that policies be adopted to “promote development in their countries of origin.” 

 “A change of attitude towards migrants and refugees is needed,” he said, “moving away from attitudes of defensiveness and fear, indifference and marginalization — all typical of a throwaway culture — towards attitudes based on a culture of encounter, the only culture capable of building a better, more just and fraternal world.”

Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist.


Voices

How we react to criticism and opposition

Father Ronald Rolheiser, OMI

Have you ever noted how we spontaneously react to a perceived threat? Faced with a threat, our primal instincts tend to take over and we instantly freeze over and begin to shut all the doors opening to warmth, gentleness and empathy inside us.

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Events

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September 20, 2014

  • Saturday, September 20

    San Fernando Region Congress, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Bishop Alemany HS, 11111 Alemany Dr., Mission Hills; $. (818) 365-5123.

    “Day of Reflection: The Word Is in Your Heart,” led by Bob Hurd, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., St. Anthony Church, 2511 S. C St., Oxnard; $. (805) 469-6293.

    Centering Prayer, introductory workshop, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Holy Spirit Retreat Center, 4316 Lanai Rd., Encino. (818) 784-4515.

    “Learn Natural Family Planning,” course presented by Couple to Couple League (also Oct. 11, Nov. 8), 9:30 a.m., St. Charles Borromeo Church, North Hollywood. (818) 994-2110.

    Holy Name of Jesus School90th Anniversary, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 2190 W. 31st St., L.A. (323) 731-1830.

    “Lyrics & Laughter,” benefit dinner-auction for Little Sisters of the Poor, 6 p.m., Norris Pavilion, 501 Indian Peak Rd., Rolling Hills Estates; $. (310-548-0625.

     “Lyrics & Laughter,” benefit dinner-auction for Little Sisters of the Poor, 6 p.m., Norris Pavilion, 501 Indian Peak Rd., Rolling Hills Estates; $. (310-548-0625.

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