• The deepest secret inside wisdom

    Everyone longs to know something that’s secret, to know something that others don’t know and the knowledge of which gives you some insight and advantage over others who are outside the inner circle of that secret.

  • Inordinate attachments: Moral flaw or struggle with divine energy?

    The renowned spiritual writer, Father Henri Nouwen, made no secret about the fact that he was emotionally over-sensitive and that he suffered, sometimes to the point of clinical depression, from emotional obsessions.

  • Contemporary writers in spirituality

    Among those who write in the area of spirituality today, who’s being read? Here’s my list of spiritual writers who are highly influential today in the English-speaking world ...

     

  • Artificial light

    What’s the use of an old-fashioned, hand-held lantern? Well, its light can be quite useful when it’s pitch-dark, but it becomes superfluous and unnoticeable in the noonday sun. Still, this doesn’t mean its light is bad, only that it’s weak.

  • Evolution’s ultimate wisdom

    Evolution, Charles Darwin famously stated, works through the survival of the fittest. Christianity, on the other hand, is committed to the survival of the weakest. But how do we square our Christian ideal of making a preferential option for the weak with evolution?

     

     

  • Who am I to judge?

    Perhaps the single most often-quoted line from Pope Francis is his response to a question he was asked vis-à-vis the morality of a particularly dicey issue. His infamous/famous reply: “Who am I to judge?”

     

     

  • Principles for interfaith dialogue

    We live inside a world and inside religions that are too given to disrespect and violence. Virtually every newscast today documents the prevalence of disrespect and violence done in the name of religion — disrespect done for the sake of God (strange as that expression may seem). Invariably, those acting in this way see their actions as sacral — justified by sacred cause.

     

  • Where to find resurrection

    Everything that’s good eventually gets scapegoated and crucified. How? By that curious, perverse dictate somehow innate within human life that assures that there’s always someone or something that cannot leave well enough alone, but, for reasons of its own, must hunt down and lash out at what’s good.

  • The gift of the dying

    The case for euthanasia generally revolves around these premises: Suffering devalues human life and euthanasia alleviates that suffering and the ravages of the body and mind that come with that suffering so as to provide a terminally ill person “death with dignity.” As well, it is argued, that once an illness has so debilitated a person so as to leave him or her in a virtual vegetative state, what is the logic for keeping such a person alive? Once dignity and usefulness are gone, why continue to live?

  • The Passion of Jesus

    As Christians, we believe that Jesus gave us both his life and his death. Too often, however, we do not distinguish between the two, though we should: Jesus gave his life for us in one way, through his activity; he gave his death for us in another way, through his passivity, his passion.

Page 2 of 22

Voices

What are we working for?

Archbishop José H. Gomez

What is work? Why do we do it and what are we working for? What does God want from our work? What does our work mean in light of our Catholic faith? 

 

Events

August 2015
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31

August 27, 2015

  • No events found.

Get our news by email

Bob Smith BMW 300x250
Bob Smith Toyota 300x250
Bob Smith Mini 300x250