Muslim scholar decries violence: 'I am a Nazarene, too'

Wael Farouq, professor of Arabic language at the American University of Cairo, Egypt at the Rimini Meeting Aug 27, 2014. Credit: Joaquín Peiró Pérez/CNA.

Referring to the label “Nazarene” marked on houses of Christians in Iraq by the militant Islamic State, a Muslim scholar also called himself Nazarene in solidarity – maintaining that many people in the Muslim community are identifying with Christians as well.

“Millions of Muslims have used the Arab letter 'nun,' or 'n,' which stands for Nazarene, as their profile picture in Facebook and Twitter, thus identifying themselves with the testimony Christians have given in Iraq,” Wael Farouq told CNA Aug. 25.

A professor of Arabic language at the American University of Cairo, Egypt, Farouq was among the 200 speakers scheduled the Annual Meeting of the ecclesiastical movement Communion and Liberation, which takes place in the Italian town of Rimini Aug. 24-29.

A major events with over 100 conferences, 17 shows, 14 exhibitions and 10 sporting events, this year's meeting holds the theme: “Towards the peripheries of world and existence.”

Addressing the Christian plight in Iraq, Farouq stressed that “terrorists and criminal are not the main characters of Iraqi scenario,” since the real “heroes are those who have chosen to stay faithful to their faith and to abandon everything they have to keep their faith.”

A declaration issued by the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue Aug. 11 asked religious leaders – Muslims in particular – to take a strong stand against acts that offend God as well as humanity, and to nurture a culture of peace.

Farouq dismissed claims that “the Muslim world is silent about what is happening in Iraq. Many religious leaders have condemned what is happening.”

For example, “the Grand Mufti of Egypt and even orthodox mufti like the Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia,” said, adding that “what is happening is the enemy number one for Islam.”

The ISNA – Islamic Society of North America – and the Center for American-Islamic Relations have also strongly condemned the actions of the militant Islamic State.

“Beyond political and religious leaders, what is more important to me is the reaction of ordinary people,” Farouq reflected.

According to him, “it is happening for the first time that interreligious dialogue start from a form of identification with the other,” as happening today while “ordinary people, millions of Muslims are identifying with Christians.”

Despite this, Farouq explains that “terrorists are not, however, isolated,” since in several countries there are “terroristic groups that use religion to justify their violence,” and this does not happen by chance.

“As a Muslim, and also as a Muslim scholar I must say that the Islamic thought, the Islamic practice today needs a deep reform to the conception of every Muslim that violence is against the principles of our religion. A reform for the Islamic world is needed,” Farouq maintained.

On the other hand, he says that terrorists gain the sympathies of some because of the extreme secularism and double standard of the Western world.

“Even the Western world is responsible of what is happening in Iraq,” Farouq underscored.

“These terrorist groups are receiving every day three million dollars from Western companies who buy oil in the black market. They are armed by Western companies,” he said.

According to Farouq, this is not something “related to Islam or the Middle East. It should be a problem for all of us, for all the world. Everybody is part of the problem for what is going in Iraq.”


Voices

Seeking the face of God in the Scriptures

Archbishop José H. Gomez

Prayer is seeking the face of God. The Catechism of the Catholic Church recalls the story of how St. John Vianney once found a peasant praying in front of the Blessed Sacrament. The saint asked him what he was doing, and the man replied: “I look at him and he looks at me.”

Events

February 2016
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

February 14, 2016

  • Sunday, February 14

    Mother Cabrini Library and Chapel Open House, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m., 3801 Scott Road, Burbank. The event is hosted by the Los Angeles Region.

     

    Italian Catholic Club of SCV Valentine's Day Dinner Dance, 7 p.m., Our Lady of Perpetual Help (Parish Hall), 23233 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Come enjoy a delicious gourmet buffet dinner and dance the night away to the music of Linda Pippin. Wear your favorite red dress, shirt and/or tie. All adults (single or married) are welcome. Tickets are $35 each (prepaid), or $45 at the door. Please call Anna Riggs at (661) 645-7877 to reserve your spot by Feb. 10.

     

    Stations of the Cross, 2 p.m. Calvary Cemetery, 4201 Whittier Boulevard, East Los Angeles. Continuing each Sunday of Lent. For more info, please call Calvary Cemetery: 323-261-3106.

     

    Year of Mercy Mass and Pilgrimage in The Shrine of St. John Paul II, 3 p.m., Our Lady of the Bright Mount Church, 3424 W. Adams Boulevard, Los Angeles.  Mass celebrated in English with Fr. John Paul Gonzalez of Christ the King Church.  Mass will be followed by Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and confession, with Divine Mercy Chaplet.  The closing prayer will be a blessing and veneration of the 1st class relic of St. John Paul II.  

    South Bay Catholic Co-ed Adult Softball League Pre-Season Practice Games, McMaster Park, 3624 Artesia Blvd., Torrance.  Must RSVP to Fred Lawler (League Commissioner) at (310) 504-0271 or fredlawler@hotmail.com.

Get our news by email

Bob Smith BMW 300x250
Bob Smith Toyota 300x250
Bob Smith Mini 300x250