• Post mortem: The end of ‘Mad Men’

    After seven seasons over the course of eight years, AMC’s award-winning series, “Mad Men” has closed its doors. In a show filled with just about every vice and human failing known to man (and woman) all woven into the fabric of almost every character, I did not expect so many tidy endings to so many untidy lives.

  • These twin friars are taking it to the streets - and your TV - to save souls

    It’s a good thing Brother Angelus wears glasses, otherwise it would be really hard to tell him apart from Brother Innocent.

  • Big love

    There was a show on HBO in the not-so-distant past called “Big Love,” which followed the travails of a practicing polygamist in Utah. I think they got the title wrong and that I could have come up with several alternative titles, but I want to continue to write for The Tidings so I will refrain from such linguistic exercises.

  • Inspired by the divine

    For the second consecutive year, reporter Julio César Ortiz, (Univision Los Angeles-KMEX Channel 34) was awarded the prestigious Gabriel Award — sponsored half a century ago by the Catholic Academy of Communication Professionals — for his sports and human interest story, “A Saint on the Field.”

  • Fishers of Men

    “Deadliest Catch” has been on for years, so the answer to the quandary of just how long people (like me) can watch crab pots get tossed overboard and then hauled up is still an open question.

     

     

  • The Big ‘C’

    Forget about your Great Whites … Cancer is by far the most successful predator of the human species.

     

     

  • Anno Domini

    In the glory days of the over-produced Hollywood Biblical epic you could always rely on certain staples. You were going to spend at least three hours in a darkened movie theater, the music would be soaring, there would be a cast numbered in the thousands and stilted acting by American stars who somehow could not pull off togas and robes the way European actors could.

  • Who’s finding whom

    CNN is still trying to “find” Jesus, so far with mixed results. The multi-part series, “Finding Jesus,” which began several weeks ago with an investigation of the Shroud of Turin’s veracity or lack thereof, has recently delved into the life of John the Baptist, the “Gospel of Judas” and the alleged existence of Jesus’ extended family of brothers and sisters.

  • NBC brings stories of the early Christian Church to network television

    If history is any indication, millions of Americans will be tuning into the premiere of a new television series depicting the early Christian Church this Easter.

  • Shrouded in mystery

    CNN’s “Finding Jesus,” which debuted on March 1, claims it will discover new and fascinating insights into the historical Jesus using the latest scientific technology. So what better way to start off a series with such a lofty objective than to dedicate its first hour to the Shroud of Turin.

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Voices

The courageous witness of Blessed Oscar Romero

Tony Magliano

Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero — who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism — would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads?

Maryknoll Lay Missioners

Events

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May 30, 2015

  • Saturday, May 30

    Life in the Spirit Seminar, 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Our Lady of Peace, 15444 Nordhoff St., North Hills. Free lunch and refreshments. For more information, call Agnes, (818) 667-89

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