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Father Rolheiser

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Good Friday

Good Friday was bad long before it was good, at least from outward appearances. God was being crucified by all that can go bad in the world: pride, jealousy, distrust, wound, self-interest, sin. It’s no accident the Gospels tell us that, as Jesus was dying, it grew dark in the middle of the day....

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Doing Violence In God’s Name

Blaise Pascal once wrote: “Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction.” How true! This has been going on since the beginning of time and is not showing few signs of disappearing any time soon. We still do violence and evil and justify them in...

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Our Shadow And Our Self-Understanding

What is meant when certain schools of psychology today warn us about our “shadow”? What’s our shadow? In essence, it’s this: We have within us powerful, fiery energies that, for multiple reasons, we cannot consciously face and so we handle them by denial and repression so as to not have to...

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Nothing Is Ever Really Ours

Everything is gift. That’s a principle that ultimately undergirds all spirituality, all morality and every commandment. Everything is gift. Nothing can be ultimately claimed as our own. Genuine moral and religious sensitivity should make us aware of that. Nothing comes to us by right. This...

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The Flavor Of God’s Energy

All things considered, I believe that I grew up with a relatively healthy concept of God. The God of my youth, the God that I was catechized into, was not unduly punishing, arbitrary or judgmental. He was omnipresent, so that all of our sins were noticed and noted, but, at the end of the day, he...

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Of Virtue And Sin

There’s an axiom which says: Nothing feels better than virtue. There’s a deep truth here, but it has an underside. When we do good things we feel good about ourselves. Virtue is indeed its own reward, and that’s good. However, feeling righteous can soon enough turn into feeling self-righteous....

ABOUT

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Since 1895, The Tidings has been telling the story of the Catholic Church — both here in Los Angeles and across the globe. On July 1, 2016, we transformed the Tidings newspaper into a multimedia platform, Angelus News.

Angelus is the weekly print “home” for, John Allen and his colleague, Inés San Martin. Nationally known Catholic journalists and essayists like Ruben Navarrette, Kathryn Lopez, Grazie Pozo Christie, and Mike Aquilina regularly contribute. Best-selling Catholic author, Dr. Scott Hahn, writes a weekly Scripture column for us. These voices complement key contributors like Archbishop Gomez, Bishop Robert Barron, Father Ronald Rolheiser and Heather King.

Angelus News provides national and worldwide reporting, stunning photography and a design that’s attractive to Catholics of every age. Features include: a weekly newsmagazine, a complete daily digital edition, social media channels and Always Forward, our weekday digital newsletter.

As the largest archdiocese in the United States, we have a great story to tell. Our parishes, pastors and community of faith are the core of our story. And Angelus News tells it well.

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Of Winners And Losers

Our society tends to divide us up into winners and losers. Sadly, we don’t often reflect on how this affects our relationships with each other, nor on what it means for us as Christians. What does it mean? In essence, that our relationships with each other are too charged with competition and...

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Welcoming The Stranger

In the Hebrew Scriptures, that part of the Bible we call the Old Testament, we find a strong religious challenge to always welcome the stranger, the foreigner. This was emphasized for two reasons: First, because the Jewish people themselves had once been foreigners and immigrants. Their...

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Embittered Moralizing

One of the dangers inherent in trying to live out a life of Christian fidelity is that we are prone to become embittered moralizers, older brothers of the prodigal son, angry and jealous at God’s overgenerous mercy, bitter because persons who wander and stray can so easily access the heavenly...

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God’s Power As Powerlessness

The French novelist and essayist Leon Bloy once made this comment about God’s power in our world: “God seems to have condemned himself until the end of time not to exercise any immediate right of a master over a servant or a king over a subject. We can do what we want. He will defend himself only...

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Acedia And Sabbath

Early Christian monks believed in something they called “acedia.” More colloquially, they called it the “noonday devil,” a name that essentially describes the concept. Acedia, for them, was different from ordinary depression in that it didn’t draw you into the dark, chaotic areas of your mind and...

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Taking Our Wounds To The Eucharist

Recently a man came to me, asking for help. He carried some deep wounds, not physical wounds, but emotional wounds to his soul. What surprised me initially was that, while he was deeply wounded, he had not been severely traumatized either in childhood or adulthood. He seemed to have absorbed the...

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Orthodoxy, Sin And Heresy

Recently, while on the road giving a workshop, I took the opportunity to go the cathedral in that city for a Sunday Eucharist. I was taken aback by the homily. The priest used the Gospel text where Jesus says, “I am the vine and you are the branches,” to tell the congregation that what Jesus is...

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My Favorite Books Of 2016

So much of life, particularly today, constitutes an unconscious conspiracy against reading. Lack of time, the pressure of our jobs and electronic technology, among other things, are more and more putting books out of reach and out of mind. There is never enough time to read. The upside of this...

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Our Churches As Sanctuaries

Whenever we have been at our best as Christians, we have opened our churches as sanctuaries to the poor and the endangered. We have a long, proud history wherein refugees, homeless persons, immigrants facing deportation and others who are endangered take shelter inside our churches. If we believe...